From Our Chairman

drriceGreetings and welcome to Brown! Over my past 6 years at Brown, I have been impressed with the dynamic nature of our program, its leaders, faculty and researchers. The most impressive and meaningful component of our department, however, is our residents. The role of a Chairman is largely consumed by administrative issues which support but are far-removed from our clinical, education and research missions. The brightest and most rewarding parts of my year, however, are the times I spend on the general medical wards working with, learning from and teaching our residents and students.

Working with our residents at the bedside has given me an appreciation for their hard work and dedication. They are collectively a group of talented, committed and principled doctors dedicated to their patients, their education and to each other. Individually, they are unique and bring many different talents and perspectives to their work, making ours a vibrant community of learners and educators. I have learned a great deal, taught some, and always had fun while participating in the serious business of caring for patients.

When I began my own residency years ago, I asked many questions. Would it be a good fit? Would I be able to continue my research? Would I enjoy working with my new colleagues? Let me share with you what I believe you will find in answer to those questions as you consider and perhaps visit Brown.

First, you will find a residency that has thrived and grown under exceptional program leadership and in an extraordinarily supportive institutional environment.

Second, you will be impressed with an amazing array of patient diversity – diversity of illness, ethnic origin, social background, and many other qualities. Morning Report has been a fascinating array of medical conditions that most physicians don’t see in a professional career.

Third, you will meet an outstanding group of smart, capable and enthusiastic residents who embrace the “ownership” of the role of physician and learner and who truly seek to understand, to heal and to provide comfort. They are fun to work with and I look forward to doing so as much as I can.

Fourth, and as important for new faculty as it is for new residents, you will find Providence to be a vibrant city with an outstanding emphasis on the arts, a fabulous array of restaurants and museums, and a spirit of tolerance, inclusion and diversity dating back to the days of Roger Williams.

My current priorities are to support and nurture what are already robust basic science and clinical research programs, to expand our efforts in quality improvement and patient safety, and to make certain that all of our faculty and resident recruitment efforts demonstrate an appropriate consideration of female and minority candidates so that our faculty and residency reflect the rich diversity of our community.

In summary, Brown is a wonderful place to practice, to study and to learn internal medicine. I am gratified to have had the honor of working with such a remarkable group of faculty and trainees here at Brown. I invite you to look into whether Brown might be as good a fit for you as it has been for me.

Louis B. Rice, MD
Chairman, Department of Medicine